Monday, January 23, 2012

The Creativity of Emotion


Last week I was bursting with the need to put pen to paper or fingers to keys. Either way, I felt like writing. Emotion brings out the most creativity, and there is none more appealing than pain. Consider all of the best film, and how the theme of pain, desire or love contributed to the success. Consider the most creative literature. Each and every sentence is pregnant with deep meaning, that sincerely touches the heart.

Recently, I took an interest in love letters or the old-school way of sexting. One particular author that really got me going was James Joyce.


This Irish novelist, and poet was one of the most highly regarded of the 20th century. The heart of all of his work resides in Ireland. He molded each of the characters in his novels after a family member, friend or enemy that was in his life. As most authors his life was sprinkled into his work, and it's obvious that this technique pays off.

Joyce was also known for writing love letters to his beloved Nora. These weren't your run-of-the-mill love letters, no not at all, Joyce was extremely descriptive about one area of their sexual life that he most enjoyed. Farting. Joyce had a fetish for flatulence. Of course, Joyce was wonderful at using flowery language to describe this fetish.
"To provoke me by obscene touches and noises, and even to do in my presence the most shameful and filthy act of the body. You remember the day you pulled up your clothes and let me lie under you looking up at you while you did it? Then you were ashamed even to meet my eyes."

Yes, he's talking about a fart

What inspires me about Joyce's love letters to Nora is his inhibition. He feels no need to hide behind his pen, and uses its ink to explain just how much he loves her even at her most unclean. Who knew a fetish could capture me in this way? Haha!

A love letter can mean so much that one will hold on to a love letter till death. An old flame may even revisit a love letter just to summon up those old emotions or find hateful ways to get rid of it, as if it represents the person that sent it. Words on a paper are deeper than the lines that appear on your nook or iPad. An inspiring novel can hold the deepest meaning, that a downloaded novel can never represent. I'm no longer sure if I'm rallying against technology or exploring the eccentricities of a love letter.

I'll end this with a love letter to Nora:

"Have I shocked you by the dirty things I wrote to you? You think perhaps that my love is a filthy thing. It is, darling, at some moments. I dream of you in filthy poses sometimes. I imagine things so very dirty that I will not write them until I see how you write yourself. The smallest things give me a great cockstand - a whorish movement of your mouth, a little brown stain on the seat of your white drawers, a sudden dirty word spluttered out by your wet lips, a sudden immodest noise made by you behind and then a bad smell slowly curling up out of your backside.

Goodbye, my darling whom I am trying to degrade and deprave. How on God's earth can you possibly love a thing like me? "

Yes, how on Earth can you possibly love a thing like me? =)

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