Wednesday, December 12, 2012

The Death of Hip-Hop: Trinidad James


When did you fall in love with hip-hop? When did rhythm and poetry float into your life?

I had many musical influences. One was my father, another was my older cousin but they both listened to music from opposite ends of the spectrum. The first Hip-Hop record I ever memorized was a track by Puff Daddy and Mase called "Can't Hold Me Down". The beat was a sample from an older record that was equally amazing. Puffy and Mase boasted about glamorous lifestyles while dealing with certain people around them plotting on their demise. Amongst their bravado they packed a message that's familiar and ultimately true.

Notorious B.I.G. would also add a taste of Brooklyn to my palette that would only mature as I did. Then Jay-Z strolled into my life providing me with the gritty substance of Biggy and the glamour of Puffy. Of course things would change. Puffy became Diddy, Mase turned to faith, Biggy lost his life, and Jay-Z redefined the American Dream.

I say all of this because of a recent discovery I have made in the world of hip-hop. That discovery is a new rapper called Trinidad James.

After watching this video, I immediately sounded the alarms and said a small prayer for music. It's obvious that there is No longer a requirement. This looks like a parody video that would receive rave reviews on Saturday Night Live. His music isn't made from talent, artistic inspiration or stories of struggle, but nonsense with a catchy hook. Wherever that bar was that Tupac and Biggy set and left behind, Trinidad James broke it in half.

I had to do my research on this travesty of an artist and I came across a recent interview with The Breakfast Club.
 

In the interview Trinidad takes his outrageous meter and switches it to "off". What you see is simply a man that puts on a great show and knows what it takes to make an impact with little effort.

trinidad james the death of hiphop image

We're giving our money to anyone now. It's obvious that record labels couldn't care less. As a consumer I'm ashamed because we have allowed this to happen. Consider artists like Chief Keef, Soulja Boy, Gucci Mane, Birdman, Nicki Minaj (since Roman reloaded). This doesn't mean I'm not a fan of "ratchet music" or "stripper songs", but even those artists have more flow and lyrical ability than this dude!

All shade to the far left, none of this is Trinidad's fault. consumers like me just want to purchase music from, and support rappers that are lyrical; That produce music of substance. Fortunately for Trinidad, he walked in at the right time or the worst time. Guess that all depends on who is listening...

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